Yuvrajs brand YWC to have its first store in Varanasi

first_imgMumbai, Aug 9 (PTI) YWC, the premium sports lifestyle brand by cricketer Yuvraj Singh, has announced the launch of its first brick and mortar standalone store in Varanasi.YWC will also be available through other multi brand outlets in Varanasi, via a shop-in-shop format, the company said.In the online space, the brand is available on Myntra and Jabong besides its own portal www.ywcfashion.com. Part of the product proceeds go to Yuvraj Singhs foundation for cancer awareness – YouWeCan. ——– Jugnoo launches partnership program for B2B productsJugnoo, a hyperlocal startup supported by auto rickshaw network and its B2B SaaS offerings, commences a new service called Jugnoo Partner Program, it said.The program invites various businesses and entrepreneurs to join as partners.It is designed for partners to have access to resources and knowledge needed to offer Jugnoo services to the final customers, Jugnoo said in a statement here.The aim is to provide top quality customer experience and to explore better business opportunities that would eventually help in generating more sales globally, it added. PTI DSK ARS SDMlast_img read more

Decision time: IOC poised to rule on Russia’s status for Rio

first_imgTweetPinShare0 Shares LONDON (AP) — As the clock ticks down to the opening ceremony in Rio de Janeiro, international Olympic leaders are facing a seminal moment.With the credibility of the fight against doping on the line and the image of the Olympic movement at stake, the IOC will hold a crucial meeting Sunday to consider whether to ban Russia entirely from the Rio Games because of systematic, state-sponsored cheating.Short of a blanket ban, the International Olympic Committee could leave it to individual sports federations to decide on a case-by-case basis whether to allow Russian athletes in their events.The doping crisis represents one of the Olympic movement’s biggest challenges since the boycott era of the 1980s, and how it plays out may well define Thomas Bach’s IOC presidency.The IOC’s ruling 15-member executive board will meet via teleconference to weigh the unprecedented step of excluding Russia as a whole from the games. Bach and others have spoken of a need to balance “individual justice” versus “collective punishment.”Time is of the essence, with the games set to open in Rio on Aug. 5.Russia’s track and field athletes have already been banned by the IAAF, the sport’s governing body, following allegations of state-directed doping — a decision that was upheld Thursday by the Court of Arbitration for Sport.Calls for a complete ban on Russia have intensified since Monday when Richard McLaren, a Canadian lawyer commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency, issued a report accusing Russia’s sports ministry of overseeing a vast doping program of its Olympic athletes.McLaren’s investigation, based heavily on evidence from former Moscow doping lab director Grigory Rodchenkov, affirmed allegations of brazen manipulation of Russian urine samples at the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, but also found that state-backed doping had involved 28 summer and winter sports from 2011 to 2015.Bach said the findings showed a “shocking and unprecedented attack on the integrity of sports and on the Olympic Games” and declared the IOC “will not hesitate to take the toughest sanctions available against any individual or organization implicated.”Russia also faces a possible ban from the Paralympic Games. Citing evidence in McLaren’s report of doping among Russian Paralympic athletes, the International Paralympic Committee said Friday it will decide next month whether to exclude the country from the Sept. 7-18 event in Rio.The decision for the IOC is loaded with geopolitical ramifications.Never has a country been kicked out of the Olympics for doping violations. And Vladimir Putin’s Russia is a sports powerhouse, a huge country seeking to reaffirm its status on the world stage, and a major player in the Olympic movement. Many international Olympic officials and federation leaders have close ties to Russia, which has portrayed the exclusion of its track athletes and calls for a complete ban as part of a political, Western-led campaign.Putin, citing the U.S. and Soviet-led boycotts of the 1980 and 1984 Games, said the Olympic movement “could once again find itself on the brink of a division.”Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev wrote an open letter to Bach on Friday to plead against a blanket ban.“I am worried and deeply upset by the possibility that in the case of a ban on Russian athletes competing in the Olympics, the innocent will be punished along with the guilty,” Gorbachev wrote. “For me the principle of collective punishment is unacceptable.”Bach and other Olympic officials have repeatedly cited the difference between collective and individual punishment.“It is obvious,” Bach said last week, “that you cannot punish a badminton player for infringement of rules or manipulation by an official or a lab director in the Winter Games.”For many in the anti-doping community, however, the choice is simple: The extent of state-backed doping in Russia has tainted the country’s entire sports system and the only way to ensure a level playing field is to bar the whole team, even if some innocent athletes will lose out.Former WADA president Dick Pound, a senior IOC member from Canada, accused Bach of dithering and failing to live up to his “zero tolerance” line on doping. He said the IOC will face a backlash if it decides against a full ban.“I think it will go down very badly,” Pound told The Associated Press. “I think there will be an athletes’ revolt, a public revolt, maybe even the sponsors. You’ve got to take control of it, and show your leadership. The hesitation makes it looks worse and worse.”If the IOC hands the authority to the sports federations, they may not have all the information they need from the McLaren report to act. Some sports, such as gymnastics, were not cited in the report and feel there is no justification to ban Russians. And the federations all have different rules.Wrestling accounted for 28 of the 312 positive tests that were covered up by Russia between 2011 and 2015, according to McLaren’s report. Nenad Lalovic, president of wrestling’s international federation, said he asked WADA to send him specifics but had yet to receive anything.“This is madness,” he said Saturday in a telephone interview with AP. “What can I do without any evidence? Do I have time to process these cases? Do the accused have a right to appeal? It’s a legal minefield. If I try to ban someone, they will take us to court and we will lose.”Russia is the dominant force in the sport and would enter 17 athletes for the Rio Games, where the wrestling competition starts on Aug. 14. Lalovic, a Serb who is also an IOC member, claimed the investigation had created an atmosphere of “hysteria” and he criticized former WADA president John Fahey of Australia for calling for an outright ban.“I’m not here to defend Russia,” Lalovic said. “They have to pay. But everyone has to take responsibility, including WADA. It’s a no-win situation. Whatever decision the IOC makes, they will look bad.”WADA and many national anti-doping agencies and athletes’ groups have led the calls for a total Russian ban from Rio.A coalition of 14 national anti-doping agencies sent a letter to Bach saying the IOC’s initial response did not meet his pledge of the “toughest sanctions available.” The group called on the IOC to suspend the Russian Olympic Committee and set up a task force that could allow certain Russians to compete under a neutral flag if proven to be clean.“Any Russian Olympic sport athlete who had not been subject to independent testing in recent months should not be in Rio,” Richard Ings, former head of Australia’s anti-doping agency, told the AP.last_img read more

NPSC to Host Information Fairs in August

first_img The fairs will take the form of information sessions and mini workshops Story Highlights medical personnel will be conducting free health checks for students These fairs will provide assistance to parents whose children will be attending secondary schools in the new academic year The Ministry of Education, through the National Parenting Support Commission (NPSC), will host a series of Information Fairs during the month of August, under the theme: ‘Surviving the Transition to Secondary School’.These fairs are being staged to provide assistance to parents whose children will be attending secondary schools in the new academic year. The first in the series will take place on Sunday, August 11 at Jamaica College, Kingston, while the second takes place on Saturday, August 24, at Port Antonio High School in Portland.The third and final fair will be held on Tuesday, August 27, at the St. Hilda’s High School in St. Ann. The fairs will commence at 12:00 noon daily.“We want to teach parents how to help their children through this transition by providing  them with coping mechanisms, and parents should be able to pass on these coping mechanisms to their children,” Executive Director of the NPSC, Dr. Patrece Charles told JIS in an interview.Dr. Charles emphasised that this initiative demonstrates the commitment of the Government towards providing support for parents.The fairs will take the form of information sessions and mini workshops. Parents will be given the opportunity to interact with each other and exchange notes.The main highlights of the fairs will be workshops targeting fathers, and the showcasing of a model ‘parent place’.“We are going to be engaging fathers. We want them to better understand their role and the impact it has on their children’s lives and how it enhances the relationship between them and the children,” Dr. Charles said.Several State agencies, including Office of the Children’s Advocate,  Child Development Agency, Registrar General’s Department, Ministry of Labour and Social Security, National Health Fund (NHF) and National Council on Drug Abuse (NCDA), will be on hand to assist parents.In addition, medical personnel, including doctors, will be conducting free health checks for students. The Ministry of Education Guidance Counsellors Association will also host counselling sessions.The NPSC, which operates through the Education System Transformation Programme (ESTP), has a mandate to co-ordinate activities relating to parenting and parenting support.Its main objective is to implement the National Parenting Policy of Jamaica that gives support to parental organisations, by teaching them about the laws of the Child Protection Act, and ensuring that children are protected and not neglected.last_img read more

Canada Post racking up close to 1 million a year in parking

first_imgTORONTO — Canada Post is racking up close to $1 million annually in parking tickets as drivers struggle to navigate increasingly congested city streets, data show.The information, obtained by The Canadian Press through freedom of information requests, indicates the bulk of the citations are in and around Toronto.“To meet the needs of Canadians, our employees have to routinely park their vehicles,” said Canada Post spokesman Jon Hamilton. “With the concentration of addresses in urban downtown cores and a rising demand for pickups and deliveries, this can cause challenges, not just for Canada Post but for all delivery companies.”Data show the Crown corporation has paid out almost $7.5 million in parking fines over the past decade. The worst year was in 2016 with $943,293 paid, slightly more than last year’s $914,831, and almost quadruple the $289,908 recorded in 2009.Under the federal Canada Post Act, the corporation has, with some exceptions, the “sole and exclusive privilege of collecting, transmitting and delivering letters to the addressee thereof within Canada.” The corporation has a fleet of almost 13,000 vehicles that delivered close to eight billion pieces of mail last year.Eric Holmes, a spokesman for the City of Toronto, said mailbox placements are approved with the “general preference” they not be placed along high-volume streets.“Illegally parking, stopping, or standing a vehicle is dangerous for pedestrians, cyclists and other motorists and creates congestion,” Holmes said. “Enforcement of parking violations is one way the City of Toronto helps deter this behaviour.”Hamilton said the corporation was an “active participant” in partnerships with Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver that aim to ease congestion, especially in downtown cores and along major access routes.“We also review our operations to make changes, such as adjusting pickup and delivery times, where possible,” Hamilton said. “It’s a bigger discussion than simply designating more delivery zones.”Overall, the fines are barely a rounding error for Canada Post, which lost $270 million last year on revenue of $6.6 billion dollars — three-quarters of the corporation’s total revenues. The company initially refused a June 2016 request for the ticket data, citing “commercial sensitivity.”It relented in June after belated intervention from the information commissioner and released the total value of tickets by region paid from 2009 until mid-2016. Asked for updated figures, the country’s largest retail network insisted on receiving a new formal access-to-information request before providing them.All regions of Canada show ticketing of branded Canada Post vehicles, but most citations are in major urban centres, where thousands of mail addresses can be concentrated in a few blocks. Despite the daunting logistics of pickup and delivery, a Toronto traffic police spokesman was blunt:“This is an easy one,” Sgt. Brett Moore said. “There is no preferential treatment for Canada Post.”In general, Canada Post’s drivers are on the hook for traffic violations. However, company policy makes allowance for parking tickets — with an excuse — except in designated accessibility spots.Emilie Tobin, with the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, said the idea of parking exemptions for Canada Post vehicles is a complex topic given that the company is federally regulated but drivers have to follow varying provincial and municipal bylaws.“In some areas, it is difficult to find a legal parking space, so our members do have to park illegally and some do incur parking tickets,” Tobin said. “It’s not an ideal system and postal workers would prefer that routes could be structured in a way that allowed for legal parking 100 per cent of the time.”The Canadian Press first published this story on Sept. 29, 2019.Colin Perkel, The Canadian Presslast_img read more