Glitz and glam at St Eunan’s College prom night – Pic Special

first_imgStudents from St Eunan’s College celebrated their prom night on Wednesday night las – with plenty of glitz and glam on display.The night of fun made for a great occasion in the Silver Tassie Hotel in Letterkenny.Clive Wasson was in attendance to capture some of the best moments. Caoimhe Gallagher and Erin Doherty at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonProm King and Queen, Aisling Cullen and Ben Harkin at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonMegan Duff and Paul Bradley at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonRosa Barrett, Roisin Conaghan and Tina Doherty at the St. Eunan’s College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonCiara O’Malley Aife Davis, Claire Young and Conor Halby at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonLucy O’Connell and Kathryn Kelly at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonKeelan Margey and Matthew Coyle at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonDarren Ferry and Mark McGinty at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonLucia McNamara, Tiernan O’Boyle, Owen Watson and Erin Doherty at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonCaoimhe Gallahger, Aoife Gallagher and Yvonne Gibson at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonLauren White and Ronan Dorrian at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonKatie Lapsley,, Liam Gallagher and Karen McClean at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonJohn Joman, Keith Bautista and Sai Prathamesh at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonFinnian O’Donnell and Maeve Doherty at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonDearbhla Doherty and James Larkin at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonMolly Moore, Rachel Foy, Laura Crossan, Jodie McGlinchey, Ronan McCann and Oisin Sweeney at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonDina Doherty, Rosa Barrett and Roisin Connaghan at the St. Eunans College prom in the Silver Tassie on Wednesday night last. Photo Clive WassonGlitz and glam at St Eunan’s College prom night – Pic Special was last modified: July 29th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Scientists’ Letter Challenges PZ Myers’ Revisionism

first_imgIn a letter to Nature, three scientists set the record straight about theology and science, after atheist P.Z. Myers got off with only a mild rebuke in a previous book review.Glenn Branch gave a fairly genteel review of The Happy Atheist by PZ Myers last month in Nature (Aug. 8).  In response, Robert White (U of Cambridge), George Ellis (U of Cape Town; see mention in ENV) and Denis Alexander (Faraday Institute; see mention in ENV, an evolution defender, ENV) – no friends of creationism or intelligent design – decided to write Nature and list a few of the “religious believers” who founded modern science.Young Earth creationists are easy to lampoon (see G. Branch Nature 500, 149; 2013). However, using reasoned arguments might hold more sway with the US creationist movement.PZ Myers, author of The Happy Atheist (which Branch reviewed), should remember that the majority of those who helped to establish the disciplines that we now practise as modern science were religious believers, including Nicolaus Copernicus, Rene Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Robert Boyle, Isaac Newton, Carl Linnaeus, Edward Jenner, Michael Faraday, Charles Babbage, Joseph Lister, William Thomson and Arthur Stanley Eddington — to name but a few, and excluding a long list of contemporary names. Half of the 10 most influential scientists of the past 350 years chosen for the Royal Society’s commemorative stamps in 2010 were religious believers.Branch had, indeed, lampooned creationists in spirit with Myers.  These three scientists, though, wanted to make sure he was not dissing “religious belief” in general.We take this opportunity for you to read some of our biographies of these great scientists by clicking their names.  Some of them were not just “religious believers” but strong Christians who studied the Bible and trusted its authority.  White, Ellis and Alexander would not wish to associate with “creationists” or even advocates of intelligent design, but they don’t want to support atheism, either – especially the brand advocated by foul-mouthed PZ Myers, who made a fool of himself on Ray Comfort’s Evolution vs God video by saying human beings are fish.It may be “easy” to lampoon creationists, but looking at all the Stupid Evolution Quotes of the Week on this site, and the many foolish things the Darwin disciples say every day (see most recent example of hundreds), who would not be embarrassed to hang with that crowd?  If Charlie worshipers wish to parade their naked emperor in public, day after day, they lampoon themselves without our help.  But to believe an intelligent, all-wise Creator made the order and complexity we see in nature, and told us what He did, why should that be a subject of scorn?  Well, look what they did to Jesus; don’t be surprised.One thing we can agree with these theistic evolutionists on: “using reasoned arguments might hold more sway with the US creationist movement.”  Great idea!  When do they start?  We dare anyone to lampoon this month’s featured scientist, Raymond Damadian, inventor of the MRI scanner – a Bible-believing creationist.  Millions owe their lives to his intelligent design. (Visited 22 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ballmer’s Latest Blunder: No Office For iOS And Android Till 2014

first_imgThe PC market is tanking. Windows 8 is proving to be a disaster. Dell is hoping to go private. HP is flailing. But not every “personal computing” company is suffering. In the past few years, Apple has sold more than 500 million iOS devices – not licenses, devices – and is selling an additional 75 million iOS devices (iPhones and iPads, mostly), each quarter. At this rate it could be only a few years before the iOS installed base surpasses the global Windows installed base.Yet Microsoft isn’t expected to offer Office on iPhone or iPad until late 2014, at the earliest. What is going on at Microsoft headquarters? Corporate hubris? Insufficient resources? Or yet another strategic blunder by Steve Ballmer?Numbers Don’t Lie What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … brian s hall Tags:#Ballmer#iOS#iPad#Microsoft The global Windows installed base is approximately 1.25 billion computers – the biggest such ecosystem in the world. But Apple’s iOS is catching up.For the world’s biggest software maker, it seems crazy to ignore the giant and fast-growing iOS market. Microsoft should be aggressively monetizing iOS devices. Instead, Microsoft appears determined to look the other way. Steve Ballmer’s obsession with Windows – growing Windows, enhancing Windows, extending Windows, promoting Windows, licensing Windows, selling Windows, profiting from Windows – may well cost Microsoft its place as the leader in consumer software. And then there’s Android, which is is technically even larger than Apple’s iOS, with an estimated 750 million devices. But Microsoft won’t have Office ready for Android, either, until 2014. In Microsoft’s defense, the Android market is highly fragmented, making it much harder for Ballmer (or anyone else) to mass market Android software. But combine iOS and Android and they’re already larger than Windows. So what the heck is Microsoft thinking?Why The Delay?Apple sells some 20 million new iPads every single quarter. Microsoft Office is not available on a single one. Nor is there a version of Office for iPhone. Well-connected Microsoft expert Mary Jo Foley says that Microsoft’s two-year roadmap reveals Office for iOS is still nearly two years away.According to Foley, Microsoft’s roadmap for Office goes like this:Incorporate the “Blue” Metro-style design to the core Office suite – Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote. (Note: The referenced roadmap does not include Outlook.)Make each Office app, e.g. Word and Excel, more touch-centric and optimize these for Windows 8 and Windows RT.Update Office for Mac.Update Office for Windows Phone.Make a version of Office for “LSX” – large screen experience – displays.Update Office for RT-based (ARM) desktops.Which brings us to Fall 2014.At which point, assuming everything goes to plan, Microsoft is scheduled to release a version of Office for iOS and Android. (Even then, Foley says the roadmap doesn’t specifically reference the iPad is not specifically mentioned. Let’s hope this is a mere oversight.)Conspiracy TheoriesIt seems bizarre that Microsoft would cling to a contracting PC ecosystem and shun the massive and growing installed base of iOS and Android devices. Why would Ballmer and Microsoft wait until Fall 2014 to tap into a market that could add hundreds of millions of dollars to the company’s bottom line? There are several theories:1. Apple’s 30% cut: To sell software for iPhone or iPad you must go through Apple’s App Store. Apple takes a 30% commission on every sale. Microsoft is loathe to hand over this rather substantial cut. Indeed, Microsoft’s quarterly corporate profit margin is about 30%. The company may be hoping to negotiate better terms.2. Channel margins: This theory suggests that Microsoft is concerned that if it were to offer Office for iOS, its price would need to be far lower than Office sold through traditional channels. Apple’s own iWork productivity suite costs less than $10 per app, while Microsoft’s Office pricing is frustratingly hard to figure out – though much more than $10 per app. Lowered Office pricing for iOS and Android could foment a revolt from the makers of desktops and laptops, such as Dell or Lenovo, over the prices Microsoft charges them for pre-loaded versions of Office. Bottom line: Microsoft does not want to threaten its lucrative Office suite profits.3. Touch is hard: Considering the lack of buyer excitement over Windows 8, which offered a radical redesign of Windows to promote touchscreen use, it may be that Microsoft is finding that building a pure-touch version of Office is more difficult than expected. 4. Surface needs time: A theory put forward this week by Microsoft watcher Paul Thurrott suggests that by delaying the launch of Office for iOS, Microsoft is buying time to grow sales of Windows 8 and Surface tablets. My theory is that given the obvious internal debate over the pros and cons of Office on iPad inside Microsoft, a deal was struck: Yes, the Office team could agnostically support non-Windows platforms with the Office 2013 wave of products. But it needed to wait until Windows 8/RT was firmly established in the market. Good luck with that. Ballmer’s Bad DecisionUltimately, there is a simple, unavoidable rebuttal to each of these theories, to every possible reason for delaying Office on iOS and Android. It does not matter.Just as the computing market shifted from mainframes to minis, from minis to desktops and from desktops to laptops, it is now being dominated by smartphones and tablets. There was a time when Apple needed Office to be on the Mac. That time is past. Now, Microsoft needs Office to be Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android.And sooner would be better than later.Note: Microsoft’s media relations has said the company has “no information to share” regarding the next series of Office updates.Steve Ballmer image by Fredric Paul. Related Posts Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img read more

Need to Table Read a Script? There’s an App for That.

first_imgScreenwriters and directors love going through a script before filming. Now there’s a tool that can make it easier: AppCoustic’s Table Read App.Top image from LucasFilmNo matter if you’re working on a feature film or an industrial video, you’re going to need a script. Before going into any type of production, you always want to get your actors together to go over the script. You’ve got to have everyone on the same page.This rehearsal is called a table read and (as a director) I require this before any shoot because it allows me to work through the characters with the actors. But sometimes I like to go through the script with my fellow scriptwriter before we even proceed with the table read. Usually this means we sit in my office and go through the script line after line. But now there is a app on the horizon that will allow us to do that with multiple voice actors.Exactly What This IsAppCoustic has created a new app called tableread that does exactly as the name suggests. As a screenwriter or director you can use tableread to review and voice act your script before you meet with your cast. This is really helpful because it allows you to sit back and review rather than try to perform the script, which I’ve done several times before going into a table read.Currently the tableread app is only available on iOS devices, but an Android version is coming soon.Video from tablereadHow to Get StartedWhen I got my hands on the tableread app, I was surprised how easily I was able to add a script and get going. I opened an email that contained a finished script and within seconds I was able to get it uploaded to the app and start the process of getting my first project going.While the free version is impressive, the Pro version is pretty amazing. With the Pro version, I was able to upload my script and then set specific voices for each of the characters. On top of this, I was able to add a score underneath, which was incredibly interesting. The only thing I wish I could have done was upload some of the music that our composer had already done.Video from tablereadThe cost for the Pro version is $2.99 a month, but you do get a seven day free trial to run through the app. Again, I was quite impressed with the app and what it can do. While the voices are really customizable, they’re still automated voices and don’t always translate your script super clearly, but this app is in its infancy. As it moves forward, I’m sure that will become less of an issue for some.Example of a Table ReadTable reads are an important part of the creative and filmmaking process. As mentioned before, screenwriters and directors love them, as they allow you to go through the story with the actors who will be portraying the characters in the film. But now the question is: have you ever seen or been apart of a table read? If not, you’re in luck. Here’s one of our favorite table reads. It’s from this year’s Comic Con and it features the cast of Family Guy acting out portion of an episode.Video from vizzcayya45As a filmmaker or videographer, do you use table reads before going into production? Do you think this new app can help you in that department? Does this new app interest you at all? Let us know in the comments below!last_img read more